Home / World / Sean Spicer may be done with press briefings. Here are his greatest hits. – Washington Post

Sean Spicer may be done with press briefings. Here are his greatest hits. – Washington Post

White House press secretary Sean Spicer has had many memorable moments since he took the high-profile position Jan. 21. Here are some of the most notable. (Bastien Inzaurralde/The Washington Post)

In Sean Spicer’s 45 years, he’s worked for four congressmen, been the spokesman for several Republican political groups and wore a giant bunny suit during White House Easter Egg Rolls.

But he will probably be most remembered for the past five months he has spent as the official mouthpiece for President Trump’s administration. Spicer’s gaffes and combativeness with the media since his second day on the job have been lampooned on “Saturday Night Live” and etched into his Wikipedia bio.

But it looks like Spicer’s time as spokesman is (possibly) coming to an end.

Trump has become increasingly frustrated with Spicer, who is expected to spend less time in front of cameras as the White House shuffles its communications office, The Washington Post’s Ashley Parker and Philip Rucker reported.

At a White House Press briefing Tuesday afternoon, a reporter asked Spicer about reports that his role was changing.

“I’m right here,” he said. “So you can keep taking your selfies.

“Look, it’s no secret we’ve had a couple vacancies, including our communications director who’s been gone for a while,” he added. “We’re always looking to do a better job of articulating the president’s message and his agenda.”


White House press secretary Sean Spicer waits for the start of an event in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington. (Susan Walsh/AP)

Here’s a look at the biggest moments of Spicer’s tenure:

Inauguration numbers

During a briefing, White House press secretary Sean Spicer accused members of the press on Saturday of “deliberately false” inaugural coverage. (Thomas Johnson/The Washington Post)

Spicer hadn’t fully unpacked his office Jan. 21 when the newly appointed press secretary made his first statement to the media.

The president was rankled that the media had tried to “minimize the enormous support that had gathered” for the inauguration, Spicer said, and he wanted to set things straight, The Washington Post reported.

He lectured the journalists about ground coverings that made it seem as if fewer people had attended and asserted that “no one had numbers” on attendance. Well, almost no one. He spouted off a few ridership totals from the D.C. Metro, which he said proved that more people had come to see Trump in 2017 than had come to see President Barack Obama in 2009.

“This was the largest audience to ever witness an inauguration — period — both in person and around the globe. Even the New York Times printed a photograph showing a misrepresentation of the crowd in the original tweet in their paper, which showed the full extent of the support, depth in crowd, and intensity that existed.

“These attempts to lessen the enthusiasm of the inauguration are shameful and wrong.”

Post reporting showed that Spicer’s numbers were off. Metro ridership for Trump’s inauguration was down compared with Obama’s first inauguration.

‘Alternative facts’

The media hammered the Trump administration about Spicer’s ridership numbers. Why would he present bogus facts that could be easily disproved?

When asked about Spicer’s inaccuracies, Kellyanne Conway, counselor to the president, said he had “alternative facts” — a response that launched a thousand memes.

How nice would it be, Americans asked, if we were also allowed to have alternative facts?

Melissa McCarthy

Without Sean Spicer, there would be no Melissa McCarthy impersonation of Sean Spicer.

As The Post’s Avi Selk reported, “McCarthy has been portraying an angry, shouty, prop-chucking Spicer on SNL since the second week of the Trump presidency — a parody of Spicer’s first news conference, at which he actually yelled at reporters about an inaccurate tweet.”

SNL brought back the fan favorite, with McCarthy portraying an angst-ridden Spicer whose anger is replaced with worry that Trump has been lying to him. The sketch involves Russian nesting dolls, a motorized podium and a dramatic kiss.

The Holocaust

White House press secretary Sean Spicer on April 11 said Adolf Hitler didn’t use chemical weapons during World War II. Hitler’s regime exterminated millions of Jews in gas chambers. (Reuters)

It was mid-April — the middle of Passover, actually — and Spicer was talking about how serious the United States is about Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s use of chemical weapons.

He told reporters that “someone as despicable as Hitler … didn’t even sink to using chemical weapons.”

But he was wrong, and his oversight about Hitler’s use of gas chambers to kill Jews and other “undesirables” did not go over well.

He later appeared on CNN to apologize:

“Frankly, I mistakenly made an inappropriate and insensitive reference to the Holocaust, for which there is no comparison. And for that I apologize. It was a mistake to do that.”

The Muslim ban  

One of Trump’s first big initiatives was an executive order that banned travelers from several Muslim-majority countries.

It sparked outrage and worry across the nation and overseas. But in the press room, Spicer was debating the definition of the word “ban.”

“The president talked about extreme vetting and the need to keep America safe, and he made clear this is not a Muslim ban,” he said. “And it’s not a travel ban. It’s a vetting system to keep America safe. That’s it, plain and simple. And all of the facts and the reading of it clearly show that that’s what it is.”

It apparently wasn’t so clear.

During 16 agonizing minutes of arguing, the press corps pushed back — and Spicer accused the journalists of inaccurate reporting.

At times, he talked over them, demanding, “Can I answer the question?”

The pope

Spicer is a Catholic — a regular at Sunday Mass who recently gave up alcohol for Lent and has spoken publicly about his faith.

But when Trump met Pope Francis during his first international trip as president (and the pair posed for an “angsty teen” photo), Spicer was noticeably absent from the presidential entourage.

Despite a reputation for combativeness with the media (see above), Spicer got some sympathy from the people on the other side of the podium.

Even Glenn Thrush, a New York Times White House correspondent whose battles with Spicer have been mocked on “Saturday Night Live,” spoke out.

The upside-down lapel pin 

White House press secretary Sean Spicer started the daily press briefing on March 10 with his flag pin turned upside down, but journalists quickly corrected him. (Reuters)

Less than a month into the job, word leaked that Trump wasn’t particularly happy with the job Spicer was doing. It was clear that Spicer was under pressure.

And one 15-second exchange made the world wonder whether Spicer was sending out a subtle cry for help. He came to the briefing with his flag lapel pin turned upside down.

According to the U.S. code, an upside-down flag is a “signal of dire distress in instances of extreme danger to life or property.”

After 15 seconds of banter with reporters, the pin was righted, but, as The Post’s Lindsey Bever reported, “the Internet lost its mind.”

So the Internet asked, tongue planted firmly in cheek, is this a cry for help, Sean?

Others opined that there was some connection to Frank Underwood, the calculating protagonist of the Netflix political drama “House of Cards.”

Read more:

Trump questions whether key funding source for historically black colleges is constitutional

Stephen Colbert channels Keyser Söze to blast Trump’s Russia ties

Stephen Colbert calls Donald Trump a liar — over and over and over again

Jon Stewart mocks Trump, slams his first days in the White House: ‘This nation is in crisis’

Source: world

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